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On EOS Blockchain, Vote Buying Is Business as Usual

On EOS Blockchain, Vote Buying Is Business as Usual


Buying votes is a big no-no in traditional democracies, but on the world’s eighth-largest blockchain it’s become an accepted way of doing business.
A new service makes it easier for EOS block producers, the nodes elected by holders of the cryptocurrency to validate transactions on the network, to share their block rewards with those who voted for them. The service, known as Genpool, was introduced this month by GenerEOS, which itself is a block producer candidate.
Back when EOSIO, the software powering the $3.7 billion EOS chain, was just an idea, the crypto community debated whether delegated proof-of-stake, or DPoS, would lead to validation candidates effectively bribing users to support them. (DPoS is a consensus mechanism that limits the number of node validators to a fixed set.) Early on, the EOS community believed it could prevent such activity.
Now the community is all-in on what proponents call “voter rebates.”
"The Genpool platform is a zero barrier to entry free market ecosystem, connecting proxy owners with voters that are looking to support quality Block Producers (BPs) while being rewarded with a percentage of the additional BP income,” GenerEOS said in a Medium post announcing the service.
GenerEOS's Tim Weston declined an interview with CoinDesk.
While similar services have launched in Asia, Genpool appears to be the first in the English-speaking EOS world explicitly designed to help token holders find the best payouts for their votes from block producers. (Like bitcoin (BTC) miners, EOS block producers are rewarded with freshly minted cryptocurrency for recording transactions on the public ledger.) In short, Genpool lets EOS (EOS) holders get paid to participate in governance.
To critics, this fulfills longstanding fears that in a system where governance is delgated, the richest will dominate. Permitting payments makes it even easier for the wealthiest to cement their position.
There is nothing stopping a validator from acting is if it were more than one entity, allowing whales to hold multiple spots on the governing council of block producers, effectively mounting a Sybil attack, the research team at the Binance cryptocurrency exchange wrote in a report released Feb. 18.
"A single actor may register multiple block producer accounts and multiply their voting weight at a negligible cost,” the report said. “Simultaneously, having multiple BP entities allows [that actor] to allocate more block rewards to voters, increasing the competitiveness of the underlying actor."
Binance stopped withdrawals of eos tokens in late January when it saw instability on the network, possibly due to upgrades to the latest version of the EOSIO software released by Block.One. Other exchanges such as Upbit and OKEx paused withdrawals at the time.
submitted by moon525 to u/moon525 [link] [comments]

batching in Bitcoin

On May 6th, 2017, Bitcoin hit an all-time high in transactions processed on the network in a single day: it moved 375,000 transactions which accounted for a nominal output of about $2.5b. Average fees on the Bitcoin network had climbed over a dollar for the first time a couple days prior. And they kept climbing: by early June average fees hit an eye-watering $5.66. This was quite unprecedented. In the three-year period from Jan. 1 2014 to Jan. 1 2017, per-transaction fees had never exceeded 31 cents on a weekly average. And the hits kept coming. Before 2017 was over, average fees would top out at $48 on a weekly basis. When the crypto-recession set in, transaction count collapsed and fees crept back below $1.
During the most feverish days of the Bitcoin run-up, when normal users found themselves with balances that would cost more to send than they were worth, cries for batching — the aggregation of many outputs into a single transaction — grew louder than ever. David Harding had written a blog post on the cost-savings of batching at the end of August and it was reposted to the Bitcoin subreddit on a daily basis.
The idea was simple: for entities sending many transactions at once, clustering outputs into a single transaction was more space- (and cost-) efficient, because each transaction has a fixed data overhead. David found that if you combined 10 payments into one transaction, rather than sending them individually, you could save 75% of the block space. Essentially, batching is one way to pack as many transactions as possible into the finite block space available on Bitcoin.
When fees started climbing in mid-2017, users began to scrutinize the behavior of heavy users of the Bitcoin blockchain, to determine whether they were using block space efficiently. By and large, they were not — and an informal lobbying campaign began, in which these major users — principally exchanges — were asked to start batching transactions and be good stewards of the scarce block space at their disposal. Some exchanges had been batching for years, others relented and implemented it. The question faded from view after Bitcoin’s price collapsed in Q1 2018 from roughly $19,000 to $6000, and transaction load — and hence average fee — dropped off.
But we remained curious. A common refrain, during the collapse in on-chain usage, was that transaction count was an obfuscated method of apprehending actual usage. The idea was that transactions could encode an arbitrarily large (within reason) number of payments, and so if batching had become more and more prevalent, those payments were still occurring, just under a regime of fewer transactions.

“hmmm”
Some sites popped up to report outputs and payments per day rather than transactions, seemingly bristling at the coverage of declining transaction count. However, no one conducted an analysis of the changing relationship between transaction count and outputs or payments. We took it upon ourselves to find out.
Table Of Contents:
Introduction to batching
A timeline
Analysis
Conclusion
Bonus content: UTXO consolidation
  1. Introduction to batching
Bitcoin uses a UTXO model, which stands for Unspent Transaction Output. In comparison, Ripple and Ethereum use an account/balance model. In bitcoin, a user has no balances, only UTXOs that they control. If they want to transfer money to someone else, their wallet selects one or more UTXOs as inputs that in sum need to add up to the amount they want to transfer. The desired amount then goes to the recipient, which is called the output, and the difference goes back to the sender, which is called change output. Each output can carry a virtually unlimited amount of value in the form of satoshis. A satoshi is a unit representing a one-hundred-millionth of a Bitcoin. This is very similar to a physical wallet full of different denominations of bills. If you’re buying a snack for $2.50 and only have a $5, you don’t hand the cashier half of your 5 dollar bill — you give him the 5 and receive some change instead.
Unknown to some, there is no hardcoded limit to the number of transactions that can fit in a block. Instead, each transaction has a certain size in megabytes and constitutes an economic incentive for miners to include it in their block. Because miners have limited space of 2 MB to sell to transactors, larger transactions (in size, not bitcoin!) will need to pay higher fees to be included. Additionally, each transaction can have a virtually unlimited number of inputs or outputs — the record stands at transactions with 20,000 inputs and 13,107 outputs.
So each transaction has at least one input and at one output, but often more, as well as some additional boilerplate stuff. Most of that space is taken up by the input (often 60% or more, because of the signature that proves they really belong to the sender), while the output(s) account for 15–30%. In order to keep transactions as small as possible and save fees, Bitcoin users have two major choices:
Use as few inputs as possible. In order to minimize inputs, you can periodically send your smaller UTXOs to yourself in times when fees are very low, getting one large UTXO back. That is called UTXO consolidation or consolidating your inputs.
Users who frequently make transfers (especially within the same block) can include an almost unlimited amount of outputs (to different people!) in the same transaction. That is called transaction batching. A typical single output transaction takes up 230 bytes, while a two output transaction only takes up 260 bytes, instead of 460 if you were to send them individually.
This is something that many casual commentators overlook when comparing Bitcoin with other payment systems — a Bitcoin transaction can aggregate thousands of individual economic transfers! It’s important to recognize this, as it is the source of a great deal of misunderstanding and mistaken analysis.
We’ve never encountered a common definition of a batched transaction — so for the purposes of this study we define it in the loosest possible sense: a transaction with three or more outputs. Commonly, batching is understood as an activity undertaken primarily by mining pools or exchanges who can trade off immediacy for efficiency. It is rare that a normal bitcoin user would have cause to batch, and indeed most wallets make it difficult to impossible to construct batched transactions. For everyday purposes, normal bitcoiners will likely not go to the additional effort of batching transactions.
We set the threshold at three for simplicity’s sake — a normal unbatched transaction will have one transactional output and one change output — but the typical major batched transaction from an exchange will have dozens if not hundreds of outputs. For this reason we are careful to provide data on various different batch sizes, so we could determine the prevalence of three-output transactions and colossal, 100-output ones.
We find it helpful to think of a Bitcoin transaction as a mail truck full of boxes. Each truck (transaction) contains boxes (outputs), each of contains some number of letters (satoshis). So when you’re looking at transaction count as a measure of the performance and economic throughput of the Bitcoin network, it’s a bit like counting mail trucks to discern how many letters are being sent on a given day, even though the number of letters can vary wildly. The truck analogy also makes it clear why many see Bitcoin as a settlement layer in the future — just as mail trucks aren’t dispatched until they’re full, some envision that the same will ultimately be the case for Bitcoin.

Batching
  1. A timeline
So what actually happened in the last six months? Let’s look at some data. Daily transactions on the Bitcoin network rose steadily until about May 2017, when average fees hit about $4. This precipitated the first collapse in usage. Then began a series of feedback loops over the next six months in which transaction load grew, fees grew to match, and transactions dropped off. This cycle repeated itself five times over the latter half of 2017.

more like this on coinmetrics.io
The solid red line in the above chart is fees in BTC terms (not USD) and the shaded red area is daily transaction count. You can see the cycle of transaction load precipitating higher fees which in turn cause a reduction in usage. It repeats itself five or six times before the detente in spring 2018. The most notable period was the December-January fee crisis, but fees were actually fairly typical in BTC terms — the rising BTC price in USD however meant that USD fees hit extreme figures.
In mid-November when fees hit double digits in USD terms, users began a concerted campaign to convince exchanges to be better stewards of block space. Both Segwit and batching were held up as meaningful approaches to maximize the compression of Bitcoin transactions into the finite block space available. Data on when exchanges began batching is sparse, but we collected information where it was available into a chart summarizing when exchanges began batching.

Batching adoption at selected exchanges
We’re ignoring Segwit adoption by exchanges in this analysis; as far as batching is concerned, the campaign to get exchanges to batch appears to have persuaded Bitfinex, Binance, and Shapeshift to batch. Coinbase/GDAX have stated their intention to begin batching, although they haven’t managed to integrate it yet. As far as we can tell, Gemini hasn’t mentioned batching, although we have some mixed evidence that they may have begun recently. If you know about the status of batching on Gemini or other major exchanges please get in touch.
So some exchanges have been batching all along, and some have never bothered at all. Did the subset of exchanges who flipped the switch materially affect the prevalence of batched transactions? Let’s find out.
  1. Analysis
3.1 How common is batching?
We measured the prevalence of batching in three different ways, by transaction count, by output value and by output count.

The tl;dr.
Batching accounts for roughly 12% of all transactions, 40% of all outputs, and 30–60% of all raw BTC output value. Not bad.
3.2 Have batched transactions become more common over time?
From the chart in 3.1, we can already see a small, but steady uptrend in all three metrics, but we want to dig a little deeper. So we first looked at the relationship of payments (all outputs that actually pay someone, so total outputs minus change outputs) and transactions.

More at transactionfee.info/charts
The first thing that becomes obvious is that the popular narrative — that the drop in transactions was caused by an increase in batching — is not the case; payments dropped by roughly the same proportion as well.
Dividing payment count by transaction count gives us some insight into the relationship between the two.

In our analysis we want to zoom into the time frame between November 2017 and today, and we can see that payments per transactions have actually been rallying, from 1.5 payments per transaction in early 2017 to almost two today.
3.3 What are popular batch sizes?
In this next part, we will look at batch sizes to see which are most popular. To determine which transactions were batched, we downloaded a dataset of all transactions on the Bitcoin network between November 2017 and May 2018from Blockchair.
We picked that period because the fee crisis really got started in mid-November, and with it, the demands for exchanges to batch. So we wanted to capture the effect of exchanges starting to batch. Naturally a bigger sample would have been more instructive, but we were constrained in our resources, so we began with the six month sample.
We grouped transactions into “batched” and “unbatched” groups with batched transactions being those with three or more outputs.

We then divided batched transactions into roughly equal groups on the basis of how much total output in BTC they had accounted for in the six-month period. We didn’t select the batch sizes manually — we picked batch sizes that would split the sample into equal parts on the basis of transaction value. Here’s what we ended up with:

All of the batch buckets have just about the same fraction of total BTC output over the period, but they account for radically different transaction and output counts over the period. Notice that there were only 183,108 “extra large” batches (with 41 or more outputs) in the six-month period, but between them there were 23m outputs and 30m BTC worth of value transmitted.
Note that output value in this context refers to the raw or unadjusted figure — it would have been prohibitively difficult for us to adjust output for change or mixers, so we’re using the “naive” estimate.
Let’s look at how many transactions various batch sizes accounted for in the sample period:


Batched transactions steadily increased relative to unbatched ones, although the biggest fraction is the small batch with between 3 and 5 outputs. The story for output counts is a bit more illuminating. Even though batched transactions are a relatively small fraction of overall transaction count, they contain a meaningful number of overall outputs. Let’s see how it breaks down:


Lastly, let’s look at output value. Here we see that batched transactions represent a significant fraction of value transmitted on Bitcoin.


As we can see, even though batched transactions make up an average of only 12% of all transactions, they move between 30%-60% of all Bitcoins, at peak times even 70%. We think this is quite remarkable. Keep in mind, however that the ‘total output’ figure has not been altered to account for change outputs, mixers, or self-churn; that is, it is the raw and unadjusted figure. The total output value is therefore not an ideal approximation of economic volume on the Bitcoin network.
3.4 Has transaction count become an unreliable measure of Bitcoin’s usage because of batching?
Yes. We strongly encourage any analysts, investors, journalists, and developers to look past mere transaction count from now on. The default measure of Bitcoin’s performance should be “payments per day” rather than transaction count. This also makes Bitcoin more comparable with other UTXO chains. They generally have significantly variable payments-per-transaction ratios, so just using payments standardizes that. (Stay tuned: Coinmetrics will be rolling out tools to facilitate this very soon.)
More generally, we think that the economic value transmitted on the network is its most fundamental characteristic. Both the naive and the adjusted figures deserve to be considered. Adjusting raw output value is still more art than science, and best practices are still being developed. Again, Coinmetrics is actively developing open-source tools to make these adjustments available.
  1. Conclusion
We started by revisiting the past year in Bitcoin and showed that while the mempool was congested, the community started looking for ways to use the blockspace more efficiently. Attention quickly fell on batching, the practice of combining multiple outputs into a single transaction, for heavy users. We showed how batching works on a technical level and when different exchanges started implementing the technique.
Today, around 12% of all transactions on the Bitcoin network are batched, and these account for about 40% of all outputs and between 30–60% of all transactional value. The fact such that a small set of transactions carries so much economic weight makes us hopeful that Bitcoin still has a lot of room to scale on the base layer, especially if usage trends continue.
Lastly, it’s worth noting that the increase in batching on the Bitcoin network may not be entirely due to deliberate action by exchanges, but rather a function of its recessionary behavior in the last few months. Since batching is generally done by large industrial players like exchanges, mixers, payment processors, and mining pools, and unbatched transactions are generally made by normal individuals, the batched/unbatched ratio is also a strong proxy for how much average users are using Bitcoin. Since the collapse in price, it is quite possible that individual usage of Bitcoin decreased while “industrial” usage remained strong. This is speculation, but one explanation for what happened.
Alternatively, the industrial players appear to be taking their role as stewards of the scarce block space more seriously. This is a significant boon to the network, and a nontrivial development in its history. If a culture of parsimony can be encouraged, Bitcoin will be able to compress more data into its block space and everyday users will continue to be able to run nodes for the foreseeable future. We view this as a very positive development. Members of the Bitcoin community that lobbied exchanges to add support for Segwit and batching should be proud of themselves.
  1. Bonus content: UTXO consolidation
Remember that we said that a second way to systematically save transaction fees in the Bitcoin network was to consolidate your UTXOs when fees were low? Looking at the relationship between input count and output count allows us to spot such consolidation phases quite well.

Typically, inputs and outputs move together. When the network is stressed, they decouple. If you look at the above chart carefully, you’ll notice that when transactions are elevated (and block space is at a premium), outputs outpace inputs — look at the gaps in May and December 2017. However, prolonged activity always results in fragmented UTXO sets and wallets full of dust, which need to be consolidated. For this, users often wait until pressure on the network has decreased and fees are lower. Thus, after transactions decrease, inputs become more common than outputs. You can see this clearly in February/March 2017.

Here we’ve taken the ratio of inputs to outputs (which have been smoothed on a trailing 7 day basis). When the ratio is higher, there are more inputs than outputs on that day, and vice versa. You can clearly see the spam attack in summer 2015 in which thousands (possibly millions) of outputs were created and then consolidated. Once the ratio spikes upwards, that’s consolidation. The spike in February 2018 after the six weeks of high fees in December 2017 was the most pronounced sigh of relief in Bitcoin’s history; the largest ever departure from the in/out ratio norm. There were a huge number of UTXOs to be consolidated.
It’s also interesting to note where inputs and outputs cluster. Here we have histograms of transactions with large numbers of inputs or outputs. Unsurprisingly, round numbers are common which shows that exchanges don’t publish a transaction every, say, two minutes, but instead wait for 100 or 200 outputs to queue up and then publish their transaction. Curiously, 200-input transactions were more popular than 100-input transactions in the period.


We ran into more curiosities when researching this piece, but we’ll leave those for another time.
Future work on batching might focus on:
Determining batched transactions as a portion of (adjusted) economic rather than raw volume
Looking at the behavior of specific exchanges with regards to batching
Investigating how much space and fees could be saved if major exchanges were batching transactions
Lastly, we encourage everyone to run their transactions through the service at transactionfee.info to assess the efficiency of their transactions and determine whether exchanges are being good stewards of the block space.
Update 31.05.2018
Antoine Le Calvez has created a series of live-updated charts to track batching and batch sizes, which you can find here.
We’d like to thank 0xB10C for their generous assistance with datasets and advice, the people at Blockchair for providing the core datasets, and David A. Harding for writing the initial piece and answering our questions.
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[AMA SUMMARY] Coin98 AMA #29 Ferrum Network with Ian Friend - COO At Ferrum Network


https://preview.redd.it/cjzluk91i6h31.jpg?width=960&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=12d87043df93ed0c81317d2857f245627f1efdf4
Coin98, a Facebook Group, recently did an AMA with Ian Friend, COO of Ferrum Network.
Grace Pham: Before we start the AMA could you please introduce a little bit about yourself as well as a quick introduction about FRM for anyone who hasn't heard about FRM yet?
Ian Friend: Yes of course. I am the Co-Founder and COO of Ferrum Network. Prior to joining Ferrum I was a lawyer in New York City where I founded my law firm's blockchain practice team. I then met Naiem Yeganeh, PhD and we founded Ferrum.
Q: Could you briefly describe what is FRM in 3-5 sentences?
Ian Friend: Ferrum is really the combination of two interconnected components. First, is the high-speed interoperability network that can connect to any blockchain and executes transactions of any digital asset - even bitcoin - in milliseconds for near zero fees.
Q: You guys are building among other things an Interoperability Network, can you explain a bit how this works and what the advantages are compare to the existing networks?
Ian Friend: Ok so the interoperability network is a innovation from an older design, essentially it uses proxy tokens that can represent any digital asset. And because it runs on a DAG instead of a blockchain, transactions can be executed instantly for almost no fees.
Q: What is the ferrum token utility in the ecosystem? Where it will be used and why the demand for the token should increase?
Ian Friend: FRM is the gas of the network. You need to spend it to run transactions. The unique thing is that everytime a token is spent, it is burned. Our African users alone will account for thousands of daily token burns on day 1 of main net launch. The token should increase as we acquire more users for our products. The next product we will launch is called UniFyre Wallet. This will be available worldwide and coming to an app store near you.
Q: What are the advantages of DAG that you used for Ferrum Network? Why did you choose DAG instead of blockchains?
Ian Friend: We chose DAG instead of a blockcahin because they are inherently faster and cheaper than blockchains because there are no miners confirming blocks. Each transaction confirms another transaction. This is more suitable for high-speed and low cost transactions like we need to run our financial products
Q: What made you decide to start with the Kudi Exchange and why Africa?
Ian Friend: Africa is a huge market with billions of people and the existing banking and financial systems are lacking in many ways. They are also open to blockchain technology. Nigeria is the 7th biggest market in the world for BTC trading.
Q: Is there any rewards for staking FRM TOKEN in the future?
Ian Friend: Yes so there is pseudo staking now thru social mining. community.ferrum.network There will be staking in the UniFyre Wallet and staking once the main net is released in 2020. But for now you can earn thru social mining which allows you to earn FRM based on teh amount you hold plus the value you provide to the ecosystem in the form of tweets, articles, videos, etc.
Q: Till now whether they conducted any TPS for their blockchain because we need to have enough security for the transactions which most of the people will show much interest in security blockchain. Through POS layer whether we can hold the coin in order to increase the staking rewards?
Ian Friend: Ferrum Network can do thousands of transactions per ssecond and each transaction clears almost instantly. Here is a demo of a BTC transaction on our test net which execute in milliseconds
Q: What is your go-to-market strategy?
Ian Friend: Depends on the product you are talking about but for Kudi Exchange we are focused on bitcoin traders in Nigeria and also signing up merchants to our point of sale system that is built into the app.
Q: What prospects of Ferrum are you most excited about?
Ian Friend: UniFyre Wallet, Infinity DEX and laucnhing fiat gateways in parts of the world that really need crypto to help improve their lives.
Q: What is your monetary policy?
Ian Friend: We are a lean start up. We built Kudi Exchange on less than $100,000. We are very frugal and never waste money.
Q: How much fund raised until now, have you reached the softcap? will you do an IEO in the future?
Ian Friend: We just did an ICO. Total raised in all rounds was $1.12 million. The last round was $300,000 and we raised it in just a few minutes.
Q: What technology stands behind Ferrum Network and why it’s better than the existing one?
Ian Friend: So fundamentally it is a DAG based interoperability network which uses decentralied proxy tokens to achieve instant transactions of any digital asset without holding anyones private keys.
Q: Currently, there is no public Github repository for the project, do you intend in showcasing the code at some point?
Ian Friend: We will be showing more public repositories as we continue. https://github.com/ferrumnet
Q: What's your plan after listing on Bitmax?
Ian Friend: Binance DEX application was made last week, we are just waiting on the validators to vote. We are in talks with many other exchanges just looking for the right one to list on next.
Q: What is the Unifire wallet? and when the Unifire wallet lauch?
Ian Friend: https://unifyre.io/ is a non-custodial wallet with many unique features like the ability to recover your assets if you lose your phone, and risk free OTC trading and staking any token. Version 0.1 will be released in the next few months. Later versions will have all the features once main net is live.
Q: What are Ferrum weaknesses?
Ian Friend: Because of our low raise we dont have a big marketing budget or a budget to spend millions to list on exchanges. We need to work hard and be creative. But it has worked for us so far considering we listed on BItMax 5 days after the ICO. We also need to hire more engineers. If anyone here is a developer, we are hiring!
Q: It's believed that staking on exchanges is a hot trend. Do you have the plan to do staking on Kudi Exchange?
Ian Friend: Not on Kudi but we will have staking of FRM on UniFyre with the push of a button. Once main net is out UniFyre will enable the staking of any token even those that do not use smart contracts like BEP-2 tokens!
Q: What is the biggest problem that Ferrum team has faced? and how has your team solved it?
Ian Friend: Many challenges but one big one was the trend in crypto to raise money and list on an exhange before any product was built or there were users. We raised only after we built Kudi Exchange. I hope this trend continues and people do not fall for "vaporware" projetcs anymore
The other big one is providing a banking app to the unbanked in Africa. With Kudi you can send real money using What's App, and access US Dollar stable coins from the same app. This had never been done before Kudi.
Q: Can you share more details about the relationship between Ferrum and Gemini? What's the benefit for user under the partnership?
Ian Friend: Sure so we partnered with Gemini to become the only app in West Afica offering a US Dollar backed stable coin. This means our Nigerian users can hedge out of volatile bitcoin, and also hedge out of their own fiat currency, which has lost 50% of its value since 2013. We are now looking to partner with other stable coin providers to offer alternatives to GUSD.
Q: What is your inflation and deflation in Tokenomics?
Ian Friend: All investor tokens are unlocked after 3 months so after that you dont have to worry about "dumping". The rest are locked up over the course of years and only slowly released. One unique thing we are doing is called the Traction Based Reserve wher tokens are unlcoked only based on the amount of burned tokens.
Q: I heard a lot people said: DEX is the future so Centralized exchange will dead. so why Ferrum don't develop DEX only?
Ian Friend: I agree in the long term DEXes are the future. But we will still need CEXs as fiat onramps/offramps. These fiat gateways are stil regulated by the financial rules, and therefore cannot be fully decentralized. At Ferrum, we have fiat gateways to buy crypto with fiat, but then you enter into a decentralized non-custodial ecosystem which has inherent benefits in terms of costs, privacy, speeds, and global reach.
Ian Friend: Thank you all for attending! Please join our channel for all things Ferrum: https://t.me/ferrum_network
https://www.facebook.com/groups/Coin98.Net/about/
submitted by freekemans to FerrumNetwork [link] [comments]

StrataMiner is ready for download. Feature-packed software package for controlling and monitoring any number of rigs.

StrataMiner is now released for beta testing. Looking for a few brave miners.
Go to strataminer.com to learn and install.
I'll be answering any questions here today. For technical support, please email me at [email protected]. Tell me what operating system you're on in the email message.
Features
Windows and Linux - Made for both. Client and Control Center don't need to be on the same OS either.
Profit Switching - Flip the switch and you'll always be mining the best currency for each device.
Any pool - StrataMiner works with any pool using a standard stratum protocol.
Web Portal - Control your rigs from anywhere on the planet with an internet connection.
24 coins and counting - AEON, Bitcoin Gold, Denarius, Ethereum, Ethereum Classic, GoByte, Groestlcoin, HUSH, Komodo, LOKI, Monacoin, Monero, MusicCoin, Pirl, Quantum Resistant Ledger, Ravencoin, Trezarcoin, Ubiq, Verge, Vertcoin, Vivo, ZCash, ZClassic, Zen. More coming.
Exchange address generation - StrataMiner can generate deposit addresses on your Cryptopia and Bittrex accounts. Once your crypto hits your exchange, you can easily exchange for 100s of others. More exchanges coming soon.
One-click updates - No installers required for updates of mining core software. Stay up-to-date through Control Center with a single click.
Community features - With pool sharing enabled, you become part of a community working to ensure pools are always available and trustworthy. This service is part of StrataMiner's commitment to decentralized mining.
Hashrate verification - StrataMiner's proprietary Adaptive Proxy technology enables auditing of pool communications to verify that hashrate reports match share submission statistics. In other words, StrataMiner makes sure everybody is being honest.
Familiar miner cores - Ethminer, Claymore Miner, CCMiner, EWBF, XMR-Stak
Automatic network configuration - The Control Center and Client know how to find each other. Turn them on and go.
Email notifications - Requires Gmail. Receive an email if something's not right. The messaging is still a little rudimentary.
Low fees - 0.5% for development. Miner cores and pools may have additional fees.
Earnings tracking - Earnings estimations are tracked over time. Earnings are recorded in both USD and crypto.
Market data - Up to date market information for each currency, including market capitalization, price, and 24-hour change.
Open source software - The Control Center is open-source and written in Python 3. See pystrata on github if you're interested in fiddling with the code.
What you get for your fee
New miners and algorithms - New stable miners will be incorporated based on community desire. Strataminer tracks algorithm changes and blockchain forks for you, so you'll always have working software, if available.
New coins - Many can be added within hours of receiving a request. No software updates required.
New features - The feature set will be improved based on community feedback. This is only the beginning.
Technical support - Development fees enable StrataMiner to respond to issues and fix bugs quickly and continuously.
StrataMiner API - New coin data, new mining software, and some market data come from the StrataMiner API.
An obvious drawback is that you'll need an address for each currency that you want to mine. If you have Cryptopia and Bittrex accounts, you can use auto-generation to make addresses for all but 4 of the supported currencies (XMR, AEON, LOKI, QRL). I'll work on integrating Binance, CoinExchange, and HitBTC next.
The Coinomi mobile wallet can also get you 16 of the 24 supported currencies.
You'll need pretty fresh drivers, partly for StrataMiner and partly for the miner cores, i.e. Ethminer, ... I actually expect to ease up on StrataMiner's driver requirements a little, but you'll still want to keep fresh drivers for the mining software updates, as they come.
On request, I've lowered the driver requirements for StrataMiner itself, but if you don't have the newest drivers, you may not be able to use Ethminer. You can still use Claymore for Ethash though. Minimum drivers are now >= 385.54 on Windows, >= 384.81 on Linux.
StrataMiner is not affiliated with or sponsored by any exchange, any pool, any other website, or any other software vendor.
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Binance Pool Mining Account name is used to fill out the 'Worker' field of a mining machine. The format is {worker_name.miner_ID}. 2. Where are the Binance Pool nodes located? Binance Pool deploys mining nodes in America, Europe, Southern China, Northern China, etc., and the network is growing. The miners that have registered on the Binance ... Bitcoin (BTC), Bitcoin Cash (BCH) & Bitcoin SV (BCH) (November 2018 - December 2019) 2.1 Efficient resource allocation theory. According to Binance Research, the mining allocation problem can be referred to as a problem of efficient resource allocation, from the perspective of participants in the Bitcoin mining industry: SHA-256 (ASIC) miners. Bitcoin is going to experience its third halving process in 2020, where the miner reward will be reduced by 50% from 12.5 BTC to 6.25 BTC. Nowadays, it's very difficult to mine Bitcoin at home as it consumes a lot of power and you need the basic BTC mining hardware - ASIC (Application-Specific Integrated Circuit) and Bitcoin mining equipment to even begin. Best für Cloud Mining: Miner-Server. Wenn Sie sich für den Einstieg in den Bitcoin-Mining entschieden haben, aber noch nicht bereit sind, in teure ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit)-Miner zu investieren, können Sie sich für einen Cloud-basierten Mining-Service entscheiden. Wenn Sie die Bitcoin Miner Pool App installieren und verwenden möchten, stellen Sie sicher, dass Bitcoin in Ihrem Land legal ist, bevor Sie die App herunterladen oder verwenden. Einige Benutzer kritisierten den Minergate Mobile Miner als ineffizient und nicht so rentabel, wie es sein sollte. CGMiner verhindert die Übermittlung veralteter Arbeit an neuen Blöcken und unterstützt mehrere ... Buy Bitcoin on Binance! How to view the 10,000 bitcoin pizza transaction. Pizza Day is an auspicious day in Bitcoin history commemorating the purchase of two large pizzas in exchange for 10,000 bitcoin. Using our block explorer, we can view and explore details about this famous transaction. Pizza Day Transaction Hash:

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